Author Archives: mimin

Building Health

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h201It’s difficult to build success when health is an issue. Building health is a prerequisite for building success. I would like to pass along the health secrets I have learned over my seventy-two years.

Diet: Foods to eat in abundance:

Vegetables: Eat kale, mustard greens, bok choy, and spinach. All four are alkalizing to the body. An alkaline body cannot harbor infections. All four should be a big part of your health building routine. The taste buds can be re-educated to include the savory flavors of vegetables. I used to be partial to anything sweet. Now I lean toward the veggies when it comes to taste.

Make at least fifty percent of your food raw. Raw foods contain all the enzymes we need to digest foods properly. Some practitioners recommend an all raw food diet. I tried this for four years with disastrous results. All raw foods can be extremely hard on the digestive tract. It’s better to lightly steam your foods.

Proteins: Protein servings should be no greater than the palm of your hand. Vegetable servings should be two palm servings. Carbohydrates should consist of one palm serving. So use your had to measure portion sizes.

Foods to avoid: Avoid all sugar and gluten. Both seriously depress the immune system. Evidence points to a relationship between excessive sugar and gluten consumption and mental illness.

Drinks to avoid: Leave alcohol and dairy alone. Raw dairy can be consumed in moderation. Alcohol should be removed entirely from anyone’s routine. Alcohol kills, plain and simple. Building health involves eliminating it altogether.

Drink at least eight glasses of water daily. Coffee can be consumed in moderation if it is organic.

Do some form of exercise at least four times a week. I find walking and tai chi to be the most beneficial.

Eliminate all artificial sweeteners. They are all neurotoxins, Stevia can be used in moderation.

Maintain a healthy attitude. Set daily intentions, do daily spiritual reading, and incorporate daily prayer into your routine. All are integral parts of building health.

Keep your body in an alkaline environment. An acidic body cannot be healthy. Alkaline foods include all vegetables, avocados, lemons, and tomatoes. Acidic foods include all meats, poultry, nuts, and seeds

Finally, never consume iced drinks or foods. They shock the stomach, the lungs, and the throat. Keep everything warm. The body thrives on warmth and dies on cold. Cold foods like watermelon can be consumed in moderation during the summer months.

Hydrate to Dominate

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h19We all know that proper hydration is at the focal point of all nutritional plans. This idea is only intensified during exercise as, with physical exertion comes a much higher necessity for hydration. The human body’s ability to perform athletic movements precisely or to conduct proper exercise is decreased even with a small amount of dehydration. At the point of dehydration, or simply not hydrated adequately your muscles won’t be anywhere near optimal performance, there’s a possibility of dizziness and your body will cramp quicker.

Many factors can change the levels of hydration needed. The environment is a major factor. Warmer weather increases sweat loss and, therefore, require a higher intake of liquids. Humidity is a major factor, separate from temperature, that causes a person to sweat much more. As the athlete becomes improperly hydrated, the sweat rate will reduce. This will cause the body temperature to rise. Additionally, higher altitudes can cause more urination and more rapid breathing, which would also lead to a greater need for water intake. Illness is another factor that can heavily affect hydration levels. Water losses of as high as 200 ml/day can be a result of a fever. Vomiting and diarrhea can cause dehydration very quickly. Pregnancy, or breastfeeding, is another factor in hydration. Women who are pregnant should intake about 10 glasses of 250 ml of fluids while women breastfeeding should consume upwards of 12 glasses.

The rate at which a person should consume water is roughly equal to the rate the person is sweating. During colder weather many athletes can tolerate slightly lower hydration levels that equal nearly 2% without a risk. However, in warmer weather (>80 degrees Fahrenheit) dehydration could lead to a heat injury (heat cramps, heat exhaustion or a heat stroke) and impairs power production and acute motor function.

Fluid replacement is the main focus of coaches across all sports when it comes to proper hydration. Most coaches and athletes don’t know, or care, the rate at which it’s acceptable for water loss or the amount of water an athlete needs to consume. The idea surrounds the rate of hydration, water breaks, an athlete receives during exercise (practice or games). It is recommended that an athlete consume water prior to an exercise so as to better prepare the body to work, and help start the body at a proper hydration level. This should begin several hours before the exercise and continue until about 15-20 minutes before exercise. Throughout the exercise or sporting event, rehydration may prove difficult due to time constraints. Athletes should ensure hydration occurs at every break, timeout or pause in the action, if possible.

You can’t talk about proper hydration without at least mentioning hyponatremia. This is caused from an imbalance between hydration (increase) and electrolytes (decrease). With this imbalance, the sodium in your body becomes diluted and your cells begin to swell, which could cause mild health problems, and, at times, more severe, possibly life-threatening issues.

Healthy Oils to Compliment Your Lifestyle

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h18Choosing to live a healthy and holistic lifestyle has never been easier. We have all seen the energetic rise in superfoods; from super berries, raw cocoa to matcha tea. Many health conscious consumers spend time seeking out the next health food, eager to see if it has the power to compliment our healthy lifestyles.

Healthy oils have recently been in the superfoods spotlight, with their endless benefits and versatility whats not to love? All hail the healthy oil revolution! In a world of choice how do we make the decision on what type we want to introduce and accept into our healthy food repertoire?

Most share similar benefits for optimising health, but each come into their own when used in different ways. Some healthy oils simply offer distinctive flavours making them ideal to use as salad dressings or sautéing food; Walnut, hemp and almond to name a few.

Naturally some are better for cooking than others. Selecting an oil that can hold a high cooking heat, often known as ‘smoking point’ is the key to cooking. Olive, avocado and organic virgin coconut oil can all be used for cooking. You may choose to embrace a few varieties into your kitchen cupboards as each offer a different usage and flavour.

When it comes to cooking organic virgin coconut oil is the winning choice, with over 90% of its fat being saturated it is naturally resistant to high heat. It is packed full of powerful health benefits, naturally high in Lauric acid believed to lower cholesterol as well as being packed full of antibacterial qualities and due to its nutritious qualities it can boost metabolism.

If you are not keen on coconut flavour, you can source odourless, still reaping all its health benefits without compromising on taste. However if the taste excites your tastebuds it really can lift a basic recipe, delicious vegetables suddenly take on a smoother and richer flavour.

Why choose ‘organic virgin coconut oil’? It simply means it has been extracted in two ways, via extraction from fresh undried coconut meat or extracted from pre dried meat. Both natural processes offer a ‘less processed’ product. Antioxidants are much higher in organic virgin varieties, increased antioxidants mean extra nourishment for our cells to absorb and benefit from.

Coconut oil is not just for your kitchen cupboard. With over 100 known uses, it does not just have to sit in your kitchen cupboard. It can be used as a moisturiser for both hair and skin, soothes cuts and grazes or use it to create your own natural deodorant. A true superfood and a trusted diverse health companion.

Lets not forget our other healthy cooking companion! The new kid on the block, Avocado also holds a high cooking heat and can be used liberally to compliment salads or simply drizzled over bread as a quick healthy snack.

This tasty alternative is a friendly carrier for other flavours, its subtle taste make it a great partner for a range of food. A great source of Vitamin E, an avid promoter of healthy skin and hair and natural appetite suppressant, avocado oil should hold a place in your healthy cupboard.

Brain Tumor: Surgery and Other Treatment Options

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h17Successfully treating tumors that form in the brain could be challenging. Brain tumor surgery can be especially difficult if the tumor is near a delicate part of the brain or the spinal cord. However, research in the past few years has significantly helped surgeons to provide better treatment options for such tumors. Surgeries have become more refined, various types of tumors that respond to chemotherapy have been identified and techniques for more targeted delivery of radiation therapy have improved the chances of survival in these cases.

Benign and Malignant

Brain tumors can be either benign or malignant. Benign tumors can generally be removed and they seldom grow back. Some benign tumors however press on sensitive areas of the brain and could cause serious health problems. Benign tumors could sometimes be life threatening too.

Malignant tumors contain cancer cells. These cells grow and divide rapidly and invade the healthy parts of the brain too. They can even spread to other parts of the body.

Treatment overview

The treatment options generally depend on several factors that include:

· Size, type and grade of the tumor

· Whether it is creating a pressure on other sensitive areas of the body

· Whether it has spread to other parts of the body

· Side effects of the treatment

· Patient’s overall health

It is a known fact that some types of tumors in the brain grow rapidly and some grow slowly. Depending on the action plan by your doctor, your treatment options could include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy or a combination of these.

Brain Tumor Surgery

Surgery is generally the first approach used for treating tumors in the brain. Removing the tumor can improve some of the neurological symptoms. It can also provide the doctors with tissue for further diagnosis.

In this surgery, a part of the skull is removed in order to operate on the tumor. After the tumor is successfully removed, bones from the patient’s body are used to cover the opening. Sometimes, performing a surgery is not possible because the tumor is located in a place where the surgeon cannot reach or is near a vital structure. In such cases the tumors are inoperable and other treatment options need to be explored.

Now -a -days advanced techniques are available for brain surgery such as cortical mapping that allows a doctor to identify the areas of the brain that are responsible for controlling the senses, speech, motor skills etc. Advanced imaging devices provide doctors with the right tools to map out the exact location of the tumor.

Other treatment options

Radiation Therapy and chemotherapy

Radiation therapy uses high energy rays to destroy the cancer cells. It is used to either slow down or stop the growth of the tumor. Radiation therapy is generally used along with chemotherapy. Chemotherapy uses drugs to destroy the cancer cells. In case of brain tumors, chemotherapy is generally used after surgery if the tumor has grown again.

Adult Basic Life Support and Resuscitation

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h16The likely-hood of being involved in any medical emergency is often slim at best, many individuals will go about their lives never having dealt with any type of medical event. Although this may be a rare occurrence, by having first aid knowledge and skill you are greatly increasing your chances of successfully aiding an individual if they suddenly become unwell, or suffer a cardiac arrest. What is a cardiac arrest? This is when the heart stops beating for whatever reason, and it’s a condition which often leads to the death of the individual. The cardiac arrest scenario is one which you’ll typically see on medical drama programs where they are doing cardio-pulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and shocking them with a defibrillator. These dramatised resuscitation attempts are often littered with inaccuracies and mistakes, however you get the idea of what a cardiac arrest is.

So what do you do if an individual were to collapse in front of you suffering from a cardiac arrest, first it’s important not to panic. By panicking you are losing control of what to do and this will not provide any help for the individual. Make sure you are in a safe environment. Do not approach your patient if they are in a dangerous predicament, for example, they’ve collapsed in the middle of a busy road. Ensure that the environment and settings allow for a safe approach so that you don’t become a casualty yourself. If it is impossible to approach the patient, the call 999. If it is safe to approach, try to make contact with the individual. Once contact has been made but they are unresponsive, check to see if they are breathing or have a pulse. You can do this by leaning over their mouths and listening for breath, and by feeling for a pulse by the wrist. If you haven’t done so already, you need to call 999 and ask for an ambulance.

You will need to begin chest compression’s, the location for this is at the centre of the chest. Ensure that the patient is on their back and on a hard surface, place a flat palm atop the centre of the chest and interlock your other hand on top of it. The centre of the chest is where the sternum is located, or often anatomically land-marked in-between the nipples. You will need to begin chest compression’s, do this by pushing down into the chest at a depth of 5-6 cm’s. After pushing down allow the chest to recoil fully, then push down again. Continue this cycle at a rate of 100-120 compression’s per minute, so around 2 every second. Depending where you are, there may be an automated external defibrillator (AED) nearby. These are often located in shopping centres and town halls, there are often many public initiatives raising money to fund AED placements in public places. Ask passers by if they are able to run and find an AED. If you are able to find one, open the pack and there will be clear instructions on how to use it. If possible try to keep someone doing CPR on the chest at all times, any time off the chest will allow for irreversible damage to be at it’s maximum to the body. The same goes for when you start to feel tired, ineffective CPR will also hinder the resuscitation attempt. If passers by are willing, try to alternate CPR every 2 minutes. Give them clear instruction on how to do CPR.

In the AED there will b two pads with a picture of where to place them, one goes on the upper right chest, the other on the far left side of chest. By turning the AED on, it will talk you through the use of the device. It may ask you to stop CPR so that it can analyse the rhythm, once it’s analysed it will advise to shock or continue CPR. If you are shocking, ensure nobody is touching the patient and that it is safe to do so. Continue doing CPR and following the advice of the AED until help arrives. By doing CPR and using an AED if available you are greatly increasing the chance of success for the patient.

Respiratory Anatomy and Physiology

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h15The respiratory system is in place to extract Oxygen (O2) from the atmosphere and get rid of Carbon Dioxide (CO2). O2 is used in chemical reactions by the cells to create energy for use in their metabolic activities, CO2 is usually a waste product created from these reactions.

The respiratory system can often be segmented into the ‘upper respiratory tract’ and the ‘lower respiratory tract’. Upper consists of the nose, the pharynx, and the larynx.

The nose and nasal cavity are used as a main source of air entry and are lined with columnar cells (ciliated columnar epithelium) which contain mucus secreting goblet cells. At the anterior of the nose there are also nasal hairs. Within the nasal cavity, conchae exist to increase surface area and cause a turbulence effect for air passing through. The respiratory function of the nose is to warm the air (which is done by the increased vascularity of the nose which explains the potential large blood loss during epistaxis), and to clean and humidify it (which is done through mucus coated nasal hairs trapping dirt and moist mucosa humidifying the air).

The pharynx follows in the next step of the upper respiratory tract. The pharynx begins at the end of the nasal cavity (nasopharynx), extends past the back of the mouth and tongue (oropharynx), and finishes at the larynx and oesophagus (laryngopharynx). The walls of the pharynx contain mucous membrane lining, submucosa, and smooth muscle. The respiratory functions for the pharynx include passage of air, warming and humidifying of air (done through the vascularity of the walls and moist mucosa), protection from pathogens (bacteria etc. through the placement of the tonsils and lymphatic tissue), and assistance in speech (through acting as a resonating chamber for sound).

The last of the upper respiratory tract ends with the larynx (voice box). The larynx is mainly made up from cartilage, dividing into 4 main structures: the thyroid cartilage, the cricoid cartilage, the arytenoid cartilage, and the epiglottis. The thyroid, cricoid and arytenoid are made up from hyaline cartilage, and the epiglottis is made up from elastic fibrocartilage. In-between the arytenoid cartilage are the vocal cords and entrance to the trachea. The respiratory functions of the larynx are to protect the lower respiratory tract (through the epiglottis blocking the passage of food into the trachea whilst eating and swallowing), to humidify and warm the air (through the moist mucosa and vascularity of the walls), and to produce speech and sound (through the use of the vocal cords).

The lower respiratory tract consists of the trachea, the lungs, the bronchi and bronchioles, the respiratory bronchioles and alveoli.

The trachea begins the lower respiratory tract anatomy, consisting of 16 to 20 incomplete ‘C’ shaped hyaline cartilage rings atop of each other. There are three layers of tissue which enclose the trachea and cartilaginous rings; the outer consists of fibrous and elastic tissue which enclose the cartilage. The middle consists of the cartilage and smooth muscle that wraps around the trachea. The inner layer is lined with columnar cells (epithelium) which contain mucus secreting goblet cells. The respiratory functions of the trachea are to warm and humidify air, to expel mucus with unwanted particles and dust (through cilia on the inner lining cells wafting mucus upwards towards the larynx where it can be either swallowed or coughed up), to provide a cough reflex (nerve endings in the larynx, trachea, and bronchi stimulate a cough reflex when irritated), and provide support and patency to the airway (through the C-shaped cartilage providing support to keep the airway open but also allow flexibility for movement and swallowing food).

The lungs are the organs which contain the further lower respiratory tract, and assist in the inspiration and expiration of air. The left lung consists of a superior and inferior lobe, the right consists of a superior, middle, and inferior lobe. The pulmonary artery, veins, and left and right bronchus enter the lungs through the hilum. Surrounding the lungs are the pleura and pleural cavity; visceral pleura coats the outside of the lungs, parietal pleura coats the inside of the chest wall and thoracic surface of the diaphragm, and the pleural cavity is the space between which contains no air, only a thin film of serous fluid. With the pleura in place the surfaces can glide over each other easily and can only be pulled apart with great difficulty. With the expansion of the chest wall and diaphragm during inspiration, atmospheric pressure within the lungs drop and air floods in to stabilize the level to normal. On relaxation of the chest the pressure increases and air is forced out.

The bronchi stem from the trachea acting as openings for air into the lungs. The left bronchus is about 5cm long and narrow, whereas the right is 2.5cm long and wider. The bronchi (more cartilaginous in structure) further expand and branch off into bronchioles (which are less cartilaginous and more smooth muscle and epithelial). The bronchioles further lead on to the end of the lower respiratory tract where the gaseous exchange can take place. Further down the bronchioles, ciliated epithelium are replaced with non-ciliated epithelium and mucus secreting goblet cells disappear. The respiratory functions of the bronchioles are to regulate the control of air entry (through contraction or relaxation of smooth muscle in the walls), and provide warming and humidifying to the air.

The bronchioles divide further into smaller respiratory bronchioles and end with the alveoli. These are thin membrane pockets (or sacks) which are surrounded by capillaries and supported by elastic fibres. Gaseous exchange happens between the membrane wall of the alveoli and capillary, which are fused firmly together and known as the respiratory membrane. Septal cells lying between the squamous cells of the alveoli secrete surfactant which prevents the alveoli from drying out. There are about 150 million alveoli in the adult lung which provide gaseous exchange. The respiratory functions of the alveoli are to provide the centre of gaseous exchange between O2 and CO2.

Assisting Intubation

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h14This is a short article looking at assisting with intubation. Ensure you have a good knowledge of what all devices are called so to avoid confusion if the anaesthetist or paramedic asks for a certain device. Lay out all devices required in a sterile environment so they are ready at hand when needed. Ensure you have a range of sizes for the different tools available, e.g. size 7, 8, 9 ET tubes, size 3, 4 laryngoscope blade. Place the items to the side of the operator if you are required to do chest compressions, or be at hand ready to pass over items when required. Ensure there is a Bougie or Introducer at hand in case of a difficult intubation. If these items are used be prepared to assist in feeding the ET over them so that they can be placed in the airway.

Consider whether the patient will be a difficult intubation, do they have excessive features like a large tongue or neck. Is there evidence of airway obstruction where suction or forceps may be required to remove the debris. If there is no obstruction and the health care professional is finding it difficult to intubate, consider assisting in positioning of the
Airway bag

patient and conducting airway/intubation manoeuvres (if you are not actively conducting CPR).

Consider whether there is an object such as a pillow in the vicinity where you could place it under the patients’ neck to provide some better sight alignment of the airway (ensure the patient has no c-spine compromise before doing this). If able to do so, consider a jaw thrust manoeuvre or lifting of the chin to aid in opening up the airway and providing better sight. Consider the BURP (Backwards Upwards Right Pressure) manoeuvre, place some fingers on the trachea and apply some pressure in the ‘BURP’ order. The health care professional may direct you where to apply further pressure with what they can visualise.

You can use the Sellick manoeuvre where there is risk of the patient vomiting whilst being intubated. Locate the cricoid cartilage and apply pressure towards the oesophagus. The idea is to collapse the oesophagus so no vomit can pass through the passageway. Use judgement when applying pressure and be cautious if querying a c-spine injury.

Once the intubation process is complete have a 20ml syringe filled with air ready for the health care professional to inflate the cuff. You may need to assist in holding the stethoscope head when auscultating the patient for tube placement confirmation. Once the tube is confirmed and tied in place, attach a catheter mount and CO2 device. Confirm the presence of CO2 and begin ventilating the patient. If in a cardiac arrest scenario, you can now provide continuous ventilations. Move any of the unused equipment a safe distance away where it doesn’t get in your way but is close enough to grab again if needed.

How to Deal With a Choking Adult

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h13Although choking isn’t a common phenomenon, it is an emergency situation where some simple first aid techniques could make all of the difference and save that person’s life. Choking is a time critical event, and by acting quick you can make all of the difference, if an individual cannot remove the foreign object occluding their airway, then suffocation and cardiac arrest will soon ensue.

What is the first thing when you realise that someone is choking, don’t panic. Keep calm and you will be best able to assist them. If you are not sure is someone is choking, simply ask them and they will give you an appropriate response. When you’ve established that the individual is choking, call 999 and ask for an ambulance, this means specialist help will be on its way. Try and encourage the patient to cough, coughing is the least invasive of the foreign away occlusion removal techniques. Individuals are sometimes able to dislodge the foreign body by coughing it out, but after a few attempts, or if they are completely ineffective/cannot cough, you will need to move onto the next technique.

Encourage the patient to lean forward, you now will need to give 5 back blows in the centre of the back, between the shoulder blades. Use a flat palm and put some force into the blow. With the patient leaning forward and the 5 back blows this can often cause enough force to dislodge the object. If these fail then you must move to abdominal thrusts. Stand behind the patient and interlock your arms at the top of their abdomen, just under where the diaphragm is. With sharp thrusts inwards and upwards 5 times, this can often cause enough pressure to shift the occlusion.

If neither of these techniques work then begin to alternate the two in a cycle, 5 back blows, 5 abdominal thrusts, 5 back blows, 5 abdominal thrusts… Continue this cycle until the object is removed or the ambulance arrives to take over care. If the patient becomes unconscious from choking and ends on the floor, start doing chest compression’s/cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). The action of CPR can often allow for the object to be dislodged. Unless you can clearly see the object and easily grasp it, never place your hands in the persons’ mouth. By doing so you may be pushing the object further into their trachea, or you may cause them to be sick and that will further occlude the airway.

Benefits of Aloe Vera For Health

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h12Aloe Vera is a “medicine plant” comprises of many health benefits. It has great healing properties in it. It is good for our health and face. This small looking plant has not only hit the market of medicines but also become an important ingredient in beauty products. It contains the different nutrients like protein, calcium, magnesium, zinc, vitamins A and E.

If we account the 100% of it then only 1% of it is used because 99% is water. This 1% is very crucial as it is found equivalent to 100 ingredients that work extremely well together. Aloe Vera is having great remedial properties due to which it is found in many consumer products. It is the one which is used in many cosmetics. Its effects are so amazing that it is found to cure the conditions such as burns and eczema.

Studies have shown that it is a very beneficial plant for the whole body. It can be used for the treatment of hair, skin as well as the face. Let’s see how this plant can do magic in making you more beautiful.

Advantages of Aloe Vera

Cure Acne: It is found that Aloe Vera can help in the treatment of acne. It naturally contains the two hormones auxins and gibberellins that work on your skin. These hormones have anti-inflammatory properties that reduce skin inflammation. Gibberellin in Aloe Vera acts as a growth hormone stimulating the growth of new cells. It allows the skin to heal quickly and naturally with minimal scarring.

Useful for both men and women: Aloe gel is beneficial for both men and women. It can be used as a moisturizer by the women having oily skin. It’s non-greasy, which doesn’t make your face look oily.

For men: It can be used as an aftershave treatment as its healing properties can treat small cuts caused by shaving.

Reduction in stretch marks: This is the problem mostly faced by the women. The appearance of stretch marks on the body is a normal process as there are many cases in which our body expand and reduce: like growing and shedding fat, post pregnancy etc. Aloe vera gel can help hide these stretch marks by healing these wounds.

The disappearance of Sunburn: We can’t embed inside the house. Once out, the sun rays can damage our skin resulting in the sunburn. In such a situation,application of Aloe gel can help you in getting rid of this problem. Its antioxidant properties heal the skin quickly.

Long and shiny hair: Aloe vera helps in the hair growth. It contains enzymes, which eradicates the dead skin cells on the scalp that could be clogging the hair follicle. It is also very useful in the condition of seborrhea which can lead to the baldness. Its keratotic action helps in the growth of hair.

Can be used as a conditioner: Our scalp is more absorbent than the skin. Aloe vera can have a tremendous effect in the nourishment of hair. It has a combination of 20 amino acids that adds strength and lustre to the hair.

Eliminate Dandruff: Dandruff makes your scalp rough and dry causing damage to hair. Aloe vera has anti-fungal properties in it. It counters a proactive fungal environment, which disallows the further growth and buildup of dandruff.

Get glowing skin with aloe vera: Your face is always a centre of attraction. Shining and the glowing face is pleasing to everyone. we apply so many products to make it beautiful, but using Aloe gel for the face can give you the amazing results. We can apply it on the face as it helps in removing the dead skin cells and generating the newer one. You can apply it as well as drink its juice which can give you the radiant skin.

Enhance the complexion: Aloe vera also helps in improving your complexion. Regular use of it lighten your skin as well as make it soft and supple.

Removes tanning: Tanning is the most common problem for those who use to spend most of the hours in the sun. Aloe vera can be used for the treatment of tanning.

Helpful in curing skin disorders: It is also useful in curing skin ailments like eczema, psoriasis, itchy skin, etc due to its anti-allergic properties. Blisters, insect bites and other allergic reactions can also be treated with aloe vera.

5 Amazing Homemade Remedies With Honey And Cinnamon

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aaHoney and cinnamon have certainly become indispensable ingredients in the international cuisine, not only because of their delicious taste and flavor, but also because of their numerous benefits. Honey has been used for thousands of years to treat the symptoms of cold and to add extra flavor to food, and here you will find 5 amazing homemade remedies based on honey and cinnamon:

1. Honey, Cinnamon And Lemon Cough Syrup

If you have caught a flu and you are coughing intensely, then you should know that honey will certainly come in handy – all you need for a delicious, nutritious and effective all-natural cough syrup is one cup of honey, three tablespoons of freshly squeezed lemon juice, a teaspoon of cinnamon and a quarter of a cup of lukewarm water. Slowly mix the lemon juice with the honey and then gradually add the warm water and then take one or two teaspoons of this homemade cough syrup before going to bed, to relieve the symptoms of cough without experiencing any side effects.

2. Natural Energy Booster

If you feel like you lack energy and you need an energy boost, yet you do not want to resort to the pills and supplements that you can find on the market, then you should know that combining honey with cinnamon can turn out to be a real, natural and efficient energy booster. Mix these two magic ingredients in equal parts and you will become more focused and more energetic for your day to day tasks!

3. Cure Arthritis With Cinnamon And Honey

Arthritis is a very common condition and it affects millions of people worldwide – if you are one of the sufferers, then you surely know how difficult it is to keep the condition under control. That being said, simply mix two spoons of honey with one teaspoon of cinnamon and one cup of water before breakfast. It must be said that this is a long-term treatment for arthritis and it needs to be taken continuously, for the results to show. However, if you follow the treatment long enough, you will notice that the symptoms of arthritis will slowly start to alleviate.

4. Improve Your Immune System

Mix two tablespoons of honey with one teaspoon of cinnamon if you have been experiencing problems with your immune system, and consume this on a daily basis. Not only will the honey and the cinnamon boost your immune system and make you stronger in front of viral and bacterial attacks, but it will also provide your body with essential nutrients, vitamins and minerals that it needs to function properly.

5. Cure Indigestion And Relieve Stomach Acidity

Last, but not least, by combining honey with cinnamon you will support the correct functioning of your immune system and you will also lower the stomach acidity levels. It often happens that our stomachs produce more acid than they are supposed to, especially when we eat spicy food – when that happens, we can experience the bothersome heartburn. Fortunately, mixing one tablespoon of honey with one teaspoon of cinnamon will keep you on the safe side!